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Thread: Legends of the Salt... Living Legends thread

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    Default Legends of the Salt... Living Legends thread

    The Living Legends


    When we think about the evolution of surf fishing, many legendary characters come to mind.

    From the humble beginnings of their heavy surf sticks paired with conventional reels and a few bucktails and tin squids, surf fishermen have come a long way.

    If there was such Hall of Fame for East Coast surfcasters, who would be in it?

    Who would you like to see in it?

    Who stands out in your mind as a character who either contributed to surf fishing in some significant way or is one of the remarkable present day surf fishermen ?

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    I want this thread to be something people might get enjoyment from for years to come. The focus of this thread will be the Saltwater Surfcasters who are still with us.


    Even though just posting the guys' name would be fine, I would like this thread to be something more than that. I would like it to be a legacy tribute to some of the most notable surfcasters out there.

    Some ways you might do that:

    1. Post up an article that was written about them, with appropriate references.

    2. Post up a paragraph or 2 or what you feel they brought to the surf fishing world, their technique, method, personality, record catches, or anything else you think might inspire future anglers to follow in their footsteps.

    3. Post up a few words how you feel their achievements or efforts at conservation have set the bar for others to follow.

    4. Don't limit yourself to my suggestions. Think outside the box. Be creative, but respectful.

    5. Don't limit yourself to just one post. Post a series of posts if the info you're bringing to the screen is lengthy. Try to break up articles with one/ post so people are more inclined to read them.

    6. Of course, if ya just wanna post up and say "I nominate Mr XYX because he did a, b, and c....
    feel free.






    Let's hear what you guys and girls think.

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    Shell E Caris. Shore Catch Guide Service. Don't know the guy but, have read a lot of things about him. Know a guy that went to a couple of his seminars.Nothing but good things I've heard. Guys kind of a legend.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rip316 View Post
    Shell E Caris. Shore Catch Guide Service. Don't know the guy but, have read a lot of things about him. Know a guy that went to a couple of his seminars.Nothing but good things I've heard. Guys kind of a legend.

    Shel E is a well respected member of the surfcaster community who paid his dues. Had some great success last year.

    There's a thread about him here:
    http://stripersandanglers.com/Forum/...ead.php?t=4343

    I know of Capt Gene Quigley and a few of the guides there. I wouldn't mind giving them a little promo linking their site as well.
    They're one of the pioneer charter outfits out there now that talk about Catch and Release with their clients.



    Post up a couple things or 2 about Shel E, Rip. It's pretty easy to find the thing I'm referring to that happened at IBSP last year with a google search. If it's a newspaper article, please remember to site the source by posting the link.

    Or, you can Copy & Paste it all from the Shore catch site if ya want to make it easier. Just add the link to their site for a reference when you post.
    http://www.shorecatch.com/home.html

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    I second Shel E. We fished IBSP back in the 70 and 80's with the hot new lure a needle fish and one of Marie's hand tied teasers ahead of it We still reminisce on Sunday mornings at a certain shop how it use to be.

    Pay attention to what history has taught us or be prepared to relive it again

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    Awesome. Are you referring to the two 50lb bass Dark?

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    ^^I remember reading that in the paper, possibly the Asbury park press. They said he had been fishing for many years and it was the first time he broke 50. I think he got another one while guiding a client. Good for him.

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    Default Shel E Caris

    He got 2 record bass last year, one for him, one for a client. He's listed along with Shorecatch on the NJDEP guidelist -

    http://www.state.nj.us/dep/fgw/guidelst.htm
    James Freda, Gene Quigley, Brian Pasch and Shell E. Caris, Shore Catch Guide Service, 85 Cowart Avenue, Manasquan, NJ 08736; 732-528-1861 or 732-528-9307; e-mail: jfreda@bytheshore.com. Specializes in saltwater fly fishing from the surf in both Monmouth and Ocean counties.

    shorecatch guide list
    http://www.shorecatch.com/guides.html


    The client's fish -
    http://www.nj.com/shore/blogs/index....09/06/07-week/

    Stripers flood into Ocean County beaches
    by Al Ristori Friday June 12, 2009, 8:22 PM


    Stiper blitz in Ocean County
    Big stripers turned on in a big way Friday all the way from Bay Head to Island Beach State Park. After a dull Thursday, the bass suddenly showed at first light, and surfcasters were able to snag them for live bait. John Green of Brick said it was a matter of following them along the beaches until dolphins drove the bunkers into the wash. Poppers didn't seem to be effective. Green took a 30-pounder and released two other bass. Many super-sized bass were among the 20-to-30-pounders. Topping them all was a trophy 55-pound, 9-ounce cow weighed at Betty and Nick's in Seaside Park by Bill Trevino. He was a client of famed surfcaster Shell E. Caris, and I understand that Caris also released a 51-pounder. Those fish were caught in Island Beach. Other top weigh-ins at Betty and Nick's included John Cobani at 46 pounds; Roy Madesen with a 41 1/2-pounder; and Ted Gruder at 41 1/4 pounds. Nick Honachefsky of Normandy Beach caught a 44-inch striper.





    The fish he caught -
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    Shel and his partners from shorecatch wrote a book -
    http://www.gazellebookservices.co.uk...1580801269.htm
    Gazelle Book Services Limited.

    White Cross Mills, Hightown, LANCASTER LA1 4XS, United Kingdom.
    Telephone: +44(0)1524 68765
    Fax: +44(0)1524 63232
    Email: sales@gazellebooks.co.uk
    Web: www.gazellebooks.co.uk

    Title:Saltwater Fishing : A Tactical Approach -- A Guide for Northeast Beach & Boat FishermenAuthor:Captain Jim Freda, Captain Gene Quigley & Shell E CarisISBN:1580801269 : 9781580801263Illustrations:50 b/w photosFormat:PaperbackSize:155x230mmPages:178Weight:.308 Kg.Published:Burford Books - November 2004List Price:14.5 Pounds SterlingAvailability:In PrintSubjects:Fishing, angling

    The owners of New Jersey's famed Shore Catch Guide Service reveal the secrets that make them the most successful charter fishing captains in the area. Drawing on almost a century of combined saltwater fishing experience, the authors reveal some hard-earned techniques and tactics to make any angler more successful -- from the boat, from the surf, or with the fly rod.

    Part 1: Jetty Fishing; Part 2: Beach Fishing; Part 3: Fishing the Back Bays; Part 4: Inshore and Offshore Boat Fishing; Part 5: The Guide's Approach -- Techniques and Strategies; Index.

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    Default Vito Orlando of the Farragut Striper club

    Vito Orlando is an institution at Montauk. There was one post on Melnyk's site where they described the "Vito Orlando death march" out to fish the night tides. I would nominate him.

    http://www.27east.com/story_detail.cfm?id=247680




    Publication: The East Hampton Press & The Southampton Press
    Nov 24, 09 9:58 AM
    Vito Orlando's 32-pound striper was one of the larger fish taken off the beach last week.

    see all images


    The topsy-turvy surf scene continued this week.
    For the sixth week in a row, stiff east winds had the fish biting in the suds—nothing unusual about that, certainly. But rather than heading for the bluffs or Jones Reef or the revetment under the Montauk lighthouse when the seas piled up, the parades of beach vehicles bristling with surf sticks were on the sand again, as they have been since the New York Football Giants started their miserable losing streak (hopefully the fish won’t reverse their parallel trend).

    And instead of the thundering cavalry of vehicles roaring down the beach after moving schools of fish, with tight knots of anglers leap-frogging each other east and west, the picket lines were more or less stationary again this week and, in civilized manner, spread far and wide along miles of beach. Except for isolated tangles when the fish seemed to be focused on a spot, elbow room was abundant.
    A sure sign of the apocalypse: Some of Montauk’s local patrol (not the legion of visitors that somehow qualify for the “Montauk Locals” surf fishing tournament these days, mind you), commonly loath to peek beyond the sands of Napeague, were even seen roaming the beaches of parts west.

    This week’s fishing was definitely the most steady and widespread of the last 30-plus days since the sand eels moved into the surf zone in earnest. Almost every size class of fish has been represented on the hook this week, from the 10-inch micros to fish into the mid and high 30-pound range. Amagansett’s beaches have seen the most fish and most of the big ones, largely thanks to their propensity to remain fairly clean when the winds churn up the ocean, but Bridgehampton, Southampton, Ponquogue and WHD have all seen their share of the action this week. As long as the east winds continue, and the weather stays mild, the fish are probably going to be pretty reliable.

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    Vito is a guy who won't give up, and if you're walking with him you had better keep up. There was also a story I read where Vito and another guy were at Montauk last year. There was a newbie next to them who just couldn't get it together and got jammed up. Vito walked over to the guy, gave him a new bucktail, a few pointers, and the guy was good to go. Vito is a class act and will help anyone.

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    GunnySniper. Also known as Ed. Ed has a 73 pounder to his credit. Also had a much bigger one on but lost it. He grew up in a fisherman's house. His Dad was a commercial fisherman. And Ed was fishing since he could walk. I believe he was 13 when he caught and landed two 50 pounders the same day. Ed is also very much in favor of conservation of the stock. Perhaps his growing up around commercial fishermen tainted his dislike for the commercial fishing business. He also builds his own plugs and rods. I have seen him turn a plug in a matter of a couple of minutes. And he can turn any style and does them all free hand....no duplicator. First time I met Ed he throws me about 5 or 6 of his custom plugs to keep and explains to me where and how to use them. He is also into skishing. His passion for fishing is incredible. Plus he's always willing to give up his spot to teach you and help you catch. The man is a walking encyclopedia of fishing knowledge. I swear he can smell where the fish are from the parking lot before we even get to the water

    And if you like your coffee strong you'll appreciate his coffee brewed on those long nights when you need a pick me up with a little roughage at the bottom of the cup but it will keep you from

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    Default Crazy Alberto, Crazy Alberto Knie

    I nominate Crazy Alberto. I have seen him at a few seminars last year. He always seems approachable. He has quite a few records of large under his belt. Even with all that, I never got a sense that he had an attitude when I or others asked him a question. I would love to have a chance to fish next to him. He appears to be just a regular guy who loves to fish, without the superstar status.

    This was published in the fisherman and on Zenos site.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This article originally appeared in the Fisherman magazine

    “Crazy” Alberto Knie

    In this month’s installment “Crazy” Alberto Knie shares his secrets of hunting for big bass during the month of June. Al is known for turning conventional wisdom on its head, concentrating on tides everyone else avoids abut his consistent ability to cull very large fish has earned him respect all along striper coast. He is a striped bass world record holder with a 45lb bass he landed on 8 lb test in June of 2004 at Shineckock. Although he is as comfortable snook fishing in Costa Rica , tossing fly’s to tarpon in Florida Keys or trout fishing all over the world his passion for striped bass and weakfish keeps him firmly implanted on local the scene during the month of June. Why does this world-class angler choose to fish local waters during this month? Read on.

    Hi Al. Tell us were do you intend to fish during the month of June?

    I like to concentrate on big fish and therefore spend a lot of time in south shore Back Bay waters. The reason is there is a lot of big baits around in these areas and big baits mean big fish. Concentrate on slack water faze and you will find big fish. You are not going to catch a lot of them but you will definitely catch quality fish.

    Do you concentrate inside the inlets?

    Yes. The mouths but mostly cuts, coves, rip in the back. You have to think about this now. The last of the flounder or whatever is left of it will stay in the mouth of the inlet or in the back coves very close to the inlet. There is overabundance of blackfish that moves in to spawn in this period of time. Sea robins, small sea bas and fluke are also abundant, so there is a lot of big bait present. That’s were you find the bigger fish. Ninety nine percent of the fish will be caught at night; this is not a day bite. The fish tend to go in the deeper cuts in daytime and they generally never venture into the shallow waters during the day in June

    Are you going after these fish with plugs or bait?

    I use big plugs. It all depends on where I am fishing. If I fish shallow waters I tend to try to “match the hatch” and the smallest bait I try to imitate is blackfish. You are talking darters, black bucktails and big rubber shads. In rough conditions, a Gibbs bottle plug is a must. Other swimming plugs? Leave them for other months. June is a big fish month, probably the best month for landing a cow. The bigger fish usually get active close to the new moon. Three days before and three days after is your window for big fish.

    What about a needlefish, thin profile lures and teasers? We have been told that in June we must try to imitate sand eels?

    I don’t use needlefish a whole lot until fall and then it is usually on the open beaches or rocky areas. Sand eels means aggressive, small fish and the pattern that I am fishing is usually big bait. Don’t get me wrong, June is a phenomenal month to catch fish, especially in the inlet areas and you can do quite well with needles and thin profile baits that imitate sand eels. But I concentrate on big fish and thru the years I found out that they feed at different stages of the tide than those small ones. So all you have been taught is true but you have to remember that if targeting a “fish”, that’s easy; there is plenty of fish around in June. Targeting big fish requires a different mindset, as there are not many big fish around. You don’t know how many times people see me on the water as I arrive and promptly inform me I just “missed the bite”. They have no idea that I am looking for one or two large fish instead of just looking to get in on the action. As for the teasers, I don’t use them in June, as they tend to attract a lot of smaller fish

    Does color of the lure matter?

    I like dark colors but in particular I like olive. If you think about it, sea robins, blackfish, sea bass, flounder, they all have a hue of olive. I have caught more big fish on olive than any other color. I also like black lures but I think olive is a better color. The black is a very dominant color but nothing there is really real black, the darkest color is olive. Most of the lures in my bag in June are a shade of olive

    How about presentation?

    Retrieve should be kept slow and you should be very, very methodical about it. You have to use all your senses and not just your eyes. You need to listen to sound around you and at times you will also be able to smell the fish in the area. Pay attention to your presentation at night. Striped bass use their lateral lines to feed and paddle tails and big plugs will cause the fish to notice your lure.

    Are big fish more difficult to fool with a plug than smaller, more aggressive ones?

    Bass are opportunistic feeders and if you can present you plug half way decent they will take it. But if you miss it they will probably give you another shot and that will be it.

    Are you looking for a particular stage of the tide in regards to bait and water movement?

    Absolutely, I am all about tides. Never on a high tide or a strong moving current. I know this fly in the face of “conventional” teaching as we have been told repeatedly to fish “high water down”. You got to think like a fish. When currents are very strong you find a place you can rest and wait, letting the more hyper and aggressive fish chase the small bait. When the opportunity comes that you can swim freely and chow down anything that you want and the fact that there are lot of big baits around, heck, they are having a feast down there. That’s why the bellies get swollen up, from munching on those big baits. Also, in June theoretically, it’s easier to locate bigger fish.

    Theoretically?

    Yes, if you know your water well. Great South Bay is great in May but if you are looking for big fish in June, concentrate on Moriches and Shineckock Inlets and even Montauk. Find some deeper pockets around the inlets and I bet you will find some large fish. Think about it, blackfish come in the 5 or six-foot water to spawn .You think those big cows are not lurking in the shadows? It’s all about bait, big bait.

    Why is it easier for these large fish to chase the bait in slow water instead of a ripping one? Don’t they always use current to feed?

    Not necessarily because in moving water they are always behind something, large fish at least, otherwise they would be wasting too much energy. That puts them in a vulnerable position where they have to rely on their reflexes to lunge at something that is passing by, chase it eat it and then go back to their original position, wasting a lot of energy. In slack water they are free to go and chase the large baits using their speed. Even although I was targeting weakfish that night, my word record 45lb bass on 8-pound test was caught very close to slack water

    Tell us little more about your slack water theory?

    It’s very, very simple. If you look at the dynamics of striped bass and how it is designed, that wide tail is built for short, lightning fast burst of speed. So at slack tide, not slack current, they can move in the area and chase and ambush big bait at will. At nighttime, especially flounder and blackfish tend to be lethargic and half asleep becoming an easy prey. As the water starts slowing down those aggressive fish will move and the bigger ones will make an appearance. They will pick up leftovers and they will attack the most vulnerable baits. This will all take place in a window of no more than ½ hour and then they move of the structure.

    Does weather play a large role in June?

    Not really. Weather in June is fairly consistent and it doesn’t play a large role unless you are talking about bunker present along the oceanfront. If there is a good amount of bunker up front a NW wind can be very good for this particular bay pattern as the bunker always feed into the wind, in case of northwest this means tight to the shore. Besides that, the weather in June rarely brings the unexpected. June is, in my opinion, an easy month to locate fish. You know they have to feed and that there is big bait close to shore. They can be very predictable, yes, big fish can be predictable. Once you locate them they will be there night after night, give or take 10 minutes, like clockwork as long as it’s dark.

    North shore, you fish there?

    If I want to chunk for big fish in June, I go to the North shore. That is not to say that certain areas on South Shore don’t hold big fish, they absolutely do, but if I am fishing south shore I am going with artificials. Think about it, western sound, Hempstead Harbor , Cold Spring Harbor , in May and June there is a big body of trophy fish there. Some of them move along towards Orient Point and some continue onto the Cape but many stay there for the summer harassing bunker. The problem is accessible shoreline to fish from and that’s why a lot of guys shy away from fishing there.





    Know your water and be a local fisherman. Why would you go elsewhere when there are big fish in your waters? Learn you water than explore elsewhere


    How about weakfish?

    I have this big fetish will weakfish. It’s the only fish that can put a hold on my bass fishing. You don’t run into a lot of them and it so happens that late May, early June you can find a decent body of big weakfish. After they spawn they can often be found feeding aggressively. I scale down my plug selection and use a lot of plastic paddle tails and such. Pink is the color and the key is to concentrate on areas of calmer moving waters. By the way, they do feed on slack water, regardless of what we have been told. But for consistency concentrate on moving water.

    Any last words?
    Know your water and be a local fisherman. Why would you go elsewhere when there are big fish in your waters? Learn you waters than explore elsewhere .The window of opportunity for catching a big fish for the year is brief. June is probably the best month to catch that trophy. If you are looking to catch big fish, a bragging rights fish, that’s the month. There are good opportunities to get a large fish in October and November but the fish are less predictable in those months. After the bass spawn in spring they get into a feeding frenzy and Mother Nature allows all those baitfish to move in the shallow waters. At night time in the moon periods, they are having a feast .If there were ever a period of time that I really enjoy going after big fish, June and October would be the two months


  13. #13
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    some more about Crazy Alberto


    “Crazy” Alberto KNIE

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    Alberto Knie, known as “Crazy Alberto,” has spent the past 45 years fishing throughout North, Central and South America. He is a renowned surf angler and holder of the IGFA world record for striped bass on 8 pound test line.


    A prolific writer, he has been published in all the New York area sport fishing magazines plus the nationals, Field & Stream and Saltwater Sportsman as well as the New York Times, New York Daily News, Newsday and the New York Post. He has also appeared in episodes of the New York regional cable television program, Northeast Angling.


    Al has a full time job in the broadcast advertising and marketing business but is also pro-staff for Lamiglas Rods, Tsunami Lures, Yo-Zuri, Gamakatsu, Spro and Snowbee. Having been to his home it is safe to say that Al has enough tackle on hand to start his own shop! If you know someone with A LOT of tackle, Al's got 10 times more!

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    Crazy Alberto is the man! And you're spot on about how nice he is, no attitude just a great surfcaster and person.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plugaholic View Post
    Crazy Alberto is the man! And you're spot on about how nice he is, no attitude just a great surfcaster and person.
    I met him at a seminar. Definitely one of the nicest guys out there, never to busy to explain something.

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    Default Willy Young

    I nominate Willy Young. He has supposably done a lot for LI surf access. People say he has fought at more meetings for this than almost any other surf fisherman. He is also on the boards of a lot of fishing groups -

    Board Member

    Montauk Surfcasters AssociationBoard Member

    Long Island Beach Buggy ***'n IncBoard Member

    KFA-NYMember (past)

    High Hill Striper Club Inc

    And is the president of the NYCRF. I met him once at one of the seminars.

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    Willy Young the fishing legend.

    He has some great catches at Montauk.

    Here is one where he got a 52lb bass, a true cow from the surf.

    wtg Willy, and hope you get a few more.





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    Good choice there strikezone. Here's a video I found where they interview him after he brought the fish in to be weighed.

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    Willie is a helluva guy and has done a lot for the surfcasters. He might be a little rough around the edges. I enjoy when he lashes out at people. 9 times out of 10 they are looking to bait him and deserve the response they get. He doesn't take crap from anyone, and man can he catch! Beautiful fish, thanks for sharing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nitestrikes View Post
    Willie is a helluva guy and has done a lot for the surfcasters. He might be a little rough around the edges. I enjoy when he lashes out at people. 9 times out of 10 they are looking to bait him and deserve the response they get. He doesn't take crap from anyone, and man can he catch! Beautiful fish, thanks for sharing.

    I know what you're talking about. You can almost tell when a fight is going to happen, the trolls will start baiting him. It would be better if he ignored those idiots. Willy is a great guy, leave him alone. Willy for President!

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