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Thread: Techniques: Bucktail

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jigfreak View Post
    ^^^^^ That mustad is a bare hook. Are you pouring your own bucktails? I keep jumping back and forth to favorite hooks. One week I like owner, another week it's dai-ichi. I was using kalins for a while, but they can straighten out when the bass are over 30 lbs. I think you're on the right track if you're targeting bigger bass on bucktails.
    You don't want a whimpy hook, It also depends on how you play the fish. Too many internet surf jockeys post a pic of straightened hooks. It wasn't the fish it was that they had their drag locked down too tight.
    You're absolutely correct jigfreak, the Mustad 34185 is a bare hook. Its also the hook that you will find on most of the better commercially tied bucktails out there.

    The Mustad 34185 is not offset however it does have a 60 degree bend in the hook shank. You will find most jig hooks have either a 60 or 90 degree bend in them depending on the mold and jig head style. A 60 degree bend is usually used for jigs that have the eye towards the front of the jig while a 90 degree bend is towards the middle of the jig.

    I have started pouring and tying my own bucktails; I needed something to do with the hollow hair found at the bottom 1/3 of the bucktails. It has very little use in fly or teaser tying as it is very bulky but it turns out those hairs make great bucktails.

    I agree with you on the Kalins, they are fine if you are targeting weakfish but anything other than that and you risk loosing nice sized fish.

  2. #22
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Mustad 34185 on Smiling Bill style jig heads...just add bucktail.

    I have the range to go up or down a size but the ones above are my preferences.

  3. #23
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    Dont be afraid to change it up if what your doing isnt working. A good retrieve is a slow steady one bouncing off the bottom, Some times it doesn't work and they want something different. Bucktails make you do the thinking and work. The reward could be a fat bass.

  4. #24
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    don't know if this was posted but it was pretty awesome. by john skinner

  5. #25
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    Are you a Henry Ford type of bucktailer?

    Henry Ford once said "You can have any color you want as long as its..."

  6. #26
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    ^^^^ Black.
    Yessiir Henry was a great innovator except when it came to color.
    I have fished black bucktails during a new moon, they can be very effective.
    I like bucktails because one size or style does not fit all. The weight and even the shape can be chosen that best fits the situation. Upperrman when you want it to sink a little more slowly. Smiling bill seems to be the bucktail of choice when fishing rocky beaches like montauk. The presentation even differs depending on the bottom. You want to catch fish consistently on bucktails you have to make note of that. Rocks require much more concentration and finesse.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Barbosa View Post
    How do you like that Kuzia style bucktail jig?
    Someone who pays attention.
    Yes I like the Stan Kuzia style bucktails very much. IMO they have a nice sink rate when fishing deeper water and a nice roll to them.

    Since John mentioned them, I thought now would be a good time to talk about the Stan Kuzia type bucktail jigs. Stan was a friend of Stan Gibbs. He's known for the style of bucktail jigs he created which was copied by several makers.





    Some more info on that here.....

    http://canalbaitandtackle.wordpress....om-stan-kuzia/

    Buck Tail Secrets from Stan Kuzia

    Posted on December 10, 2011 by Canal Bait and Tackle

    I am a very fortunate person because I have had the privilege of growing up and fishing with men and women that are now considered to be legends. These fishermen have taught me a lot of helpful tricks. But, the man that has helped me out the most is Stan Kuzia. Stan comes in the store every day and just schools me on how to fish. He is 88 years old and still is down the Canal every day casting wooden plugs. He doesn’t jig anymore because his shoulders are too weak. But, let me tell you Kuzia has the best casting technique of all time, it is just so smooth and effortless. Conventional or spinning, it doesn’t matter his technique is pristine. Stan might look like much but he is no joke, whatever he has forgotten about fishing in his old age, is more then I will ever know. Kuzia was best friends with the late Stan Gibbs and use to help Gibbs test and design all the custom wooden plugs for the ever popular Gibbs Lures company. As Stan Gibbs was a master at top water fishing, Stan Kuzia is the all-time ranging champ of bottom fishing.

    Stan Kuzia is known for creating the Ku-Jig Company. The Ku-jig is the most popular buck tail jig in the Canal area. Sure, Stan hasn’t poured a single jig to sell in 20 years, but every single lure company that makes Buck Tails has the Ku-jig mold. You see the names in most tackle stores; Cape Cod Canal Jig, Canal Special Jig, etc… This man created the fascination of the Buck Tail Jig. Everyone in the Canal area uses these lures, so this article is made to give some insight on all the lessons Kuzia has told me.

    (One little word of advice) If you don’t lose any Buck Tail Jigs, then you are not jigging the correct way. You need to pay homage to the Canal God’s to catch a river monster, it’s just that simple. Give to receive, fishing is all about karma.

    These fishermen have been skunked hundreds of times down the Canal. But, they did what every great fisherman does, they asked questions, learned from their mistakes, and used patience to evolve and adapt their fishing game. Fishing is an art form; everyone can learn it and perfect it, but to be perfect you first need to be patient. Kuzia was patient and now the guy is a legend.








    **
    If any one else has comments about this bucktail or any other style or technique...feel free........

  8. #28
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    The original Kuzia (ku-jig) with the eyes molded from lead and usually painted over with a marker (not painted on this one).

    Click image for larger version. 

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    A modified Kuzia style jig with a recessed cavity for 3D eyes and hook eyelet placed more towards the front.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #29
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    Those are great to use on a new moon night JB.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monty View Post
    I am a terrible Bucktail Fisherman and not much better at fishing Rubber Shad types of artificials.
    Any thoughts at when you would use one of these over the other? Advantages at times of one over the other?
    Times they are interchangeable?
    I have more confidence fishing the rubber shad types of artificials. Have a better feel of them. And have caught more fish on them than bucktails.
    The big drawback for me is BLUES and rubber. The rubber shads get taken off first sign of the yellow eyed demons.

    I probably use bucktails three times more frequently than rubber. Like to throw rubber early spring when the fish are sluggish. Also late fall when the blues have thinned out. IWO - the bucktail and pork is one of the things out there that takes the least amount of $$ out of your pocket and will catch fish in the most diverse conditions. Many folks don't want to take the time to learn the techniques that will be successful.
    Have you read John Skinner's book on bucktails? He does a great job of explaining different weights and techniques. Here is part of it.

  11. #31
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    That was the best book I've read on bucktailing good read.I picked up a lot of info.
    Cranky Old Bassturd.

  12. #32
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    Any preferences for choosing sizes of the pork? Guidelines? Size 50 or 70?
    White Water Monty 2.00 (WWM)
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  13. #33
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    I like the size 50 for the surf, the 70 and bigger when fishing the inlets and rivers. Just my preference, others may feel different.

  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Monty View Post
    Any preferences for choosing sizes of the pork? Guidelines? Size 50 or 70?
    The 50 is much thinner than the 70.

    Very basic look at it:

    the 50 gives you a smaller profile and faster sink rate.
    the 70 gives you a slightly larger profile and slower sink rate

    You can play around with different weight bucktails and pork.

    Montauk regulars prefer bucktails with extra hair for buoyancy and the #70 rind.

    If I have time tonight I will take a picture of both sizes side by side.

    FYI - the containers will leak if you don't keep them upright and the pork will dry out if you don't keep it in the liquid.

  15. #35
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    Andrus Jetty Caster: Andrus Lure Company Millville, NJ

    When Rich Andrus started fishing Montauk at the tip of Long Island, most of the local surfcasters were market fishermen, selling their catches to supplement their income. None of the other fishermen wanted anything to do with me, Andrus said, until they saw me catching fish on the Jetty Caster. Then I had a lot of friends.

    The Jetty Caster is a style of bucktail made by Rich for his company, Andrus Lures. Based in Millville, New Jersey, Rich has travelled throughout the Northeast sampling the fishing and looking for inspiration for new lures. It might surprise some surfcasters to learn that this favorite bucktail style for the surf originated as a lure for trolling on wire line.

    The inspiration for the Jetty Caster came before a trip with Frank Sabatowski, captain of the charter boat, Junebug. Those well-versed in striper fishing lore will recognize this as the very same vessel aboard which Charlie Cinto landed a 73-pound state-record striped bass on Sow and Pigs Reef off Cuttyhunk Island in Massachusetts.

    I was fishing out of Sakonnet Point with a captain, and we weren't catching anything, but I could see the boat Junebug catching fish after fish.

    After that Rich began to charter the Junebug. One year, Frank asked me to bring some bucktail jigs because he ran out. So I made them, trying to make them close to the ones he'd been using on his boat. Those were the first of the Jetty Casters. Tipped with green pork rind and trolled on wire line, that style of jig that was how Frank caught a lot of his big fish. But he was secretive about it. When he pulled the lure over the side, he cupped it in his hand so the other boats wouldn?t be able to see what he was using.

    The lure did eventually migrate to the surf. It took a while to catch on, Rich said. Surf guys would constantly hang it in the boulders under the light at Montauk. But then, we started fishing it the same way we fished them on wire line, keeping them moving. You had to start retrieving them as soon as they hit the water.

    The extra hair tied into the Jetty Caster helped keep the lure over the rocks and off the bottom on retrieves slow enough to entice stripers. The hair also gave the lure more action as it pulsed through the water during the retrieve. In addition to the extra hair, the Jetty Caster has a rounded head and a strong Mustad hook.

    The Jetty Caster has become the best seller in the Andrus line, displacing bluefish-specific lures like the Ponytail that previously held the top spot. The Ponytail is a very productive bluefish trolling lure, and thanks to the chain used to attach the hook, is resistant to the blues sharp teeth. Rich also makes other styles of bucktails, including another productive surfcasting style, the Rip Splitter. The Andrus Fluke Dart, an oversized shad dart with a bucktail skirt, is downright deadly on shallow-water flatfish when tipped with a strip of bait or scented artificial. Andrus also offers trolling lures like the Parachute Jig and Jigit Eel.

    Rich went full time into selling lures on April 15, 1974. The first shop to carry Andrus Lures was Johnny's Tackle Shop on Main Street in Montauk. Johnny Kronuch, whose son now runs the shop, gave Rich some helpful, albeit gruff, advice. I went in there and handed Johnny one of my jigs, and he grabbed the hook, twisted it in his fingers and said, Need bigger hooks. This won't work here.

    The hooks available on the Jetty Caster now are about as tough as they come. One of the most popular sizes, the 1-1/2 ounce model, has an 8/0 Mustad.

    For colors, the Jetty Caster comes in white, black, yellow, chartreuse, and now, due to increasing demand, a maroon red. A lot of guys seem to want red jigs these days, Rich explained. Rich also offers the lures in two-color combos like orange/black and black/purple.

    Though Montauk Point was the proving ground for the Jetty Caster, it works anywhere stripers swim. Jetty Casters are available in 1/2, 3/4, 1 1/4, 1/2, 2, 2 1/2 and 3-ounce sizes. The 1/2-ounce size is popular in backwater areas, while the other end of the spectrum, the 3-ounce is used in deeper water, heavy surf, or high winds. For an all around size, 1 1/2 ounces seems to be the sweet spot. For a relatively small lure, compared to some of the giant plugs and out-sized soft-plastic baits on the market, the Jetty Caster has accounted for an unbelievable number of large striped bass.

    While trolling the Jetty Caster on wire line may have faded from the repertoire of most striper anglers, the jig's extra hair and action underwater has made it popular for three-way-rigging and fishing the deep, strong currents of eastern Long Island Sound.

    In the surf, Rich has found the most success by keeping the jigs moving. One of the most popular and effective techniques for fishing the Jetty Caster is to swim the jig, retrieving the jig at a steady pace, breaking it up with the occasional twitch of the rod tip. With the extra hair slowing the rate of descent of the jig, anglers can fish them anywhere from just under the surface to just above the bottom just by varying how long they allow the jig to sink.

    Where ever you fish them, tip the jigs with some manner of trailer. A Jetty Caster paired with a strip of Uncle Josh number 70 pork rind is tough to beat, but curly-tail grubs will work as well.

    Andrus, now 72, surfcasts on Block Island for a week each fall, but does most of his fishing closer to his Millville, New Jersey home, including the Cape May Point jetties, where the smaller-size Jetty Casters are deadly on the local stripers.

    Today, under the Montauk Light, you're likely to find a lot of friends tossing an Andrus Jetty Caster bucktail, because this simple, yet superb lure was, is and will continue to be one of the best striped bass catchers ever made.

    Article Published in: On The Water, May 29 2012.

  16. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Barbosa View Post
    The 50 is much thinner than the 70.

    Very basic look at it:

    the 50 gives you a smaller profile and faster sink rate.
    the 70 gives you a slightly larger profile and slower sink rate

    You can play around with different weight bucktails and pork.

    Montauk regulars prefer bucktails with extra hair for buoyancy and the #70 rind.

    If I have time tonight I will take a picture of both sizes side by side.

    FYI - the containers will leak if you don't keep them upright and the pork will dry out if you don't keep it in the liquid.
    Thanks JB, I was going to take some pics the other night, to much going on lately. Will get around to it.

    Great article on the Andrus Bucktails.
    White Water Monty 2.00 (WWM)
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  17. #37
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    I found a lot of good information in this thread. Do most of you tie direct to the bucktail? I've heard of some using small snaps to make changing lures easy, especially at night. Not sure if that makes a bucktail less effective. How about teasers?

  18. #38
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    ^^^^^ I dont know about others but I use a relatively cheap snap unless big fish are around then I use one of crazy albertos.
    If you are always fishing the rocks I suppose direct tie is ok because its easier to break off if you get hung up. As for the action or making it less effective I don't think so. The thing about bucktails and fish is that YOU are the fish catcher not what you are throwing. To me it depends on how you work it. Hope that helps, good luck.

  19. #39
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    how long are the 50 UJ pork strips? the 70s?

  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by surfrob View Post
    how long are the 50 UJ pork strips? the 70s?
    70S is 5 1/4" X 5/8"

    50 is 4" x 3/8"

    Did not fish them much this year, should have in some of the water I fished.
    Only caught one bass on a bucktail 3:00 am late October, 70 S pork.
    Next year will fish them much more in certain areas where current is relatively strong.

    White Water Monty 2.00 (WWM)
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